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at the national. >> nearly 50 years after the march on washington, our work, dr. king's work, it is not yet complete. we gather here at the moment of great challenge and great change. in the first decade of this new century, we have been tested by war and by tragedy, economic crisis and its aftermath that has left millions out of work in poverty on the rise and millions more to struggle to get by. indeed, even before this crisis struck, we have entered a decade of rising inequality and stagnant wages, and too many troubled never across the country the conditions of our poor citizens appear a little changed from what existed 50 years ago. neighborhoods with underfunded schools and broken down slums, inadequate health care, constant violence, neighborhoods in which to many young people grow up with little hope and peace prospects for the future. >> president obama speaking in 2011 at the dedication of the martin luther king monument on the national mall in washington, d.c. journalist, author tavis smiley has spent the past year criss- crossing the country with activist and professor cornell w
, the inauguration also comes on the federal holiday in honor of dr. martin luther king, jr., who delivered his "i have a dream" speech 50 years ago, not far from here at the lincoln memorial. later in our special coverage, we will air excerpts of some of dr. king's less often played speeches, including "beyond vietnam." why he opposed the war in vietnam. but first, we turn to some of the voices of hope and resistance from sunday night's piece ball. not affiliated with any political party, the celebration at the mead center for american theater paid tribute to the continuing struggle for peace and justice here in the united states and throughout the world. we begin with naacp president benjamin jealous. >> this is the place to be tonight. the challenge for our country was never to see the day when a person of color would be president, know the challenge for our country was to ensure that it would be safe for it to happen again and again. we knew it could be condoleezza rice. it could be colin powell. but we got barack obama. we got a man who was a product of a progressive movement. as we stand her
that dr. king had that said there is right thing. i just try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminate hunger, walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> barack obama was a little- known state senator from an aillinois. the third african-american in the u.s. senate. i spoke to him after his great victory in illinois at a time when most people knew him as a skinny kid with a funny name from the south side of chicago. the phrase you have been accustomed to using, the skinny kid with a funny name from the south side of chicago. beyond that issue, how did you get beyond getting beyonpeople o vote for a guy whose name they could not renounce? >> they still screw it up sometimes. the call me alabama or yo mama. one thing that i confirmed in this race is the american people are decent people. they get confused sometimes. they're busy. there stressed. they are tired. sometimes they are watching fox news, that will ge
. >> bob: it's remarkable coon dense it would fall the same day as dr. king's, the marked anniversary of dr. king, who in my view was probably one of the greatest human beings that walked the face of the earth. i say that also i'm sorry to my dad who worked with dr. king was not here to see first the black president get elected but to see and hear that, people forget how quickly and powerfully martin luther king organized the black community and brought great process. the right thing to say. >> kimberly: wouldn't martin luther king be proud to see how far we have come as a country, electing a black president not once but twice. >> bob: he's looking down and seeing it. >> kimberly: civil rights with the president. let's listen to what the president had to say and then we'll get reaction. freddie talk about kimberly. >> dana: i like your red dress. >> kimberly: you like it? >> it's not complete until our mothers and daughters earn a living equal to the efforts. [ applause ] our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. for if we are
] and when he signed the bill, he reminded us of what dr. king often called life's most persistent and urgent question -- what are you doing for others? and in my family, the only wrong answer to that question is nothing. but there are as many right answers as there are people in this tent today and people in our country. eva spoke about how her parents inspired her. my parents certainly inspire me every day. but today, when i engaged in a service project with my husband mark, i will be thinking about my grandmother dorothy who started giving back when she was a child. she volunteered in her local school, helping to tutor migrant workers, farm children in southern california, in reading in english and writing. as she got older and had her own children, she provided school trips. she always wanted to cook an extra lunch for someone whose parents could not provide that for them. when she got older still, her children, including my mom, had left the hall. she became a big sister to mentor young girls like her who had been neglected and abused as a child. when she got older still and she could no
: and look for an acknowledgement of dr. martin luther king's vision on the day we honor the civil rights leader, a coincidence of timing that's not lost on the nation's first african american president. now, the speech was finalized over the weekend, but the president often makes final word changes up to the very end, and this time was no exception. i'm told that he made tweaks this morning, in fact. the president, i'm told, will speak for under 20 minutes. by reading prior inaugural addresses, he decided the shorter, the better. his last address was just over 18 minutes. his favorite two past inaugurals were kennedy's, which ran just under 14 minutes, and, of course, lincoln's second, which at 700 words, had to be fewer than ten minutes. i'm told president obama had a quiet breakfast with the first lady and his daughters before going to church. anderson? >> let's talk about it with john king and gloria borger. what are you anticipating, john, hearing today? >> i think broad strokes. time to bring the country together. time to get through the tough economic times. i think it will be a ca
just one man, dr. king made an extraordinary difference in all of our lives. and while he himself was silent, his dream lives on and serves as an inspiration that one person can make a difference. mr. kildee: dr. king reminds me the strikers of the 1930's in my hometown who also stood up to the injustices that they saw. their efforts helped create the labor movement and made our country a better place, as did dr. king. mr. speaker, no matter our political differences, we can all unite on monday to fulfill dr. king's dream. this martin luther king day, let's honor the man who continues to inspire us all. thank you. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from-month seek recognition? mr. daines: to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from montana is recognized for one minute. mr. daines: mr. speaker, i rise today to recognize alexus wineman. this 18-year-old from cut bank, montana, represents my state as miss montana and she recently made
championed the issues public safety and crime reduction. since the assassinations of dr. martin luther king and robert kennedy, we have pushed as an organization commonsense solutions to reduce the access to guns by those who simply should not have them. we have called for background checks for everyone who purchases a weapon, whether in a store or at a gun show. we have demanded that assault weapons and large capacity magazines designed to serve our military needs, but with no practical use on america's streets or in our neighborhoods the band. .. would move washington to action. once again we were wrong. but then december 14th, 2012, we all witnessed a tragedy in newtown, conn. that even after all of the others, we still cannot imagine. 20 children, ages 6 or 7 shot dead in sandy hook elementary school, six of their teachers and administrators. terrible, and forgivable moment in american history. we cannot get those lives back. we cannot get back the more than 30,000 lives lost each year to gun violence. but we can and we must act to help protect the lives of those in the future. this has
, bobby kennedy was her -- assassinated two days before i walked across the stage for graduation. dr. king, the one who got week engaged in politics, was assassinated earlier that year. even assassination attempt at a george wallace. it is no wonder things held together quite frankly. well, the congress passed what was then called the gun control act. among other things it said that felons, fugitives, drug users, those who have been adjudicated and it is not a politically correct phrase, but it is in the law, those that are mentally affected could not own a gun. 1994 as a world change in country changed, along with the thing i am proud is for having written and passed about. we added a new category of people who were prohibited from purchasing a gun. based on facts, not on fiction. that is those who had a restraining order issued against them in a domestic violence incident. that was a fight to get that added. then, two years later we expanded the list again to include anyone convicted of a misdemeanor violent crime, that they were the most likely people to do something. time and experienc
's going to be west. >> cenk: i think that's important. >> that's where the gray area comes in. dr. king wanted a certain person in office but not strictly based on color but what he does. it's not based on color but what he does. cornell was not saying you shouldn't swear on the bible but you can't say that but not carry it out with fruition. >> cenk: you thought that dr. west went too far before. you largely agree with him. >> no matter after that, anything he says is valid isn't this the crazy guy? you don't want to listen to what he has to say. now let's not let his good comments go to waste. >> cenk: we have to leave it there. chris geithner, michael shure thanks so much, guys, great conversation. >> thank you. >> cenk: now when we come back, well lupe fiasco is a guy we've had on this show. they invited him invited him to sing, it was anti-obama. [ ♪ singing ♪ ] the sirius xm satellite radio in the 2013 ram 1500. engineered to move heaven and earth. guts. glory. ram. the new ram 1500. motor trend's 2013 truck of the year. [ ♪ theme music ♪ ] >> cenk: all rig
-- the conversation could not be more timely. i sell the time, quoting dr. king, that budgets are moral documents. you can say what you say, but you are what you are. we know who you are when you put your budget on the table. we can see what your budget priorities are. could not be more timely. we are days away -- it will be a big party on monday, but after monday as we move toward the debt ceiling conversations and the spending cuts get placed on the table, the poor are likely to take it on the chin. that is why we are here with in washington tonight having this conversation. our hashtag is #povertymustend. our website is afuturewithoutpoverty.com. you'll find a letter on that website -- you can electronically sign it asking the president to give a major public policy address on poverty sooner than later, and second to convene a white house conference on the eradication of poverty to bring experts to get into crafting national plan to cut poverty in half and eradicate it in the richest nation in the world. it is not a skill problem, it is via upawe have the will to the poverty a priority with in this
about dr. king. then at 10 a-m the free "make the dream real" celebration will begin at mc-clemonds high school in oakland. that's at 2-6-0-7 myrtle street. in san francisco there will be events throughout the day, including film screenings and award ceremonies. that's at yerba buena gardens starting at 11 a.m. crews in san leandro have coming up, dramatic development in the fight on alzheimer's oh! progress-oh! -oh! -oh! oh! oh! ♪ what do you know? oh! ♪ bacon? -oh! -oh! oh! [ female announcer ] with 40 delicious progresso soups at 100 calories or less, there are plenty of reasons people are saying "progress-oh!" share your story for a chance to win a progress-oh! makeover in hollywood. go to facebook.com/progresso to enter. ♪ ♪ conquer dinner. one cut of meat at a time. the everyday collection. by target. >> welcome back. working crews in san leandro controlled a water main break that closed a roadway saturday night. the break lead to flooding on foothill boulevard. from carolyn street to manchester road. crews shut down the area while they worked to control the rising water. t
with the words "holy bible" etched into it. the king bible was dr. king's trebling bible. an avid reader, dr. king traveled with a selection of books that included this bible the president will be using. it was used for inspiration and preparing sermons. henry in huntington, west virginia, on our independent line. caller: i just wanted to call and say, really wish i could be in washington d.c. today. i have a lot of optimism about the next four years. i think mr. obama is doing a heck of a good job. he is getting a lot of his promises down. i hope the next four years are as good as the last. thank you for having me. host: eric in seattle, what do think about all this? -- do you think about all this? you always have to turn down the volume and dirty -- on your tv. in today's inaugural, you'll hear a lot from senator schumer. here he is explaining his role in today's inauguration. >> the hardest part is trying to make sure everybody, there will be a huge crowd, not as big as four years ago, but a huge crowd, they get to their places, their seeds or standing places. as you know, there were big
saved the union and had to fight a war, but 100 years later, it was dr. martin luther king, who had to fight another war, a war of ideas and a war of values, look how we have progressed just from the 50 years of martin luther king. i became secretary of state. i became a chairman. as a kid in the south bronx section, unthinkable. and barack obama became president of the united states. >> you had stinging things to say about the republican party. an identity problem, you said. and that there are some people who seem to have a theme of intolerance. >> that's a broader definition of what i meant by intolerance. i think intolerance is when you try to keep people from voting. the republican party ought to be out there, not by restricting voting by requiring i.d., but wanting everybody to vote. you need new messages. new policies. the country is becoming more minority. >> have you heard a lot from that? a lot of people pushing back on you? >> most of the people i've heard from in the last week or so have been very, very supportive. but there are those who consider this the worst thing ima
my father was in memphis april 4th, 1968, when dr. king was assassinated. he said he felt like they were trying to kill hope in america. and then i was with my father when he was on his death bead beds in 2008, looked up and see obama and say the hope is back. there's something, we're in a country, the other thing, you know for sure, there will be a first latino president or a latina president. there will be a first gay president. a first lesbian. we're going to keep making this history. i don't want us to get used to it. i want the goose bumps every time. >> what struck me about watching that and there have been a lot of pieces on this over the last week or so, is how comfortable the president seems. you know, four years ago, he hadn't be spent a lot of time in washington. he was, you know, effectively a junior senator who became president of the united states, and there was all of this high expectation for him which his aides will tell you that was a problem because they could never live up to the expectations. if you look at barack obama in that picture, it was sort of like,
the aura of dr. king today quite well. >> pelley: and this day being inauguration day and martin luther king day all at the same time. doug, thanks very much. cbs news live coverage of the inauguration of president obama will continue from washington in just a moment. [ male announcer ] nearly sixteen million people visit washington dc every year. some come to witness... some to be heard. we come to make an impact. to learn from leaders... and to lead others. to create... and create change. we are the george washington university... we come to make history. your doctor will say get smart about your weight. i tried weight loss plans... but their shakes aren't always made for people with diabetes. that's why there's glucerna hunger smart shakes. they have carb steady, with carbs that digest slowly to help minimize blood sugar spikes. and they have six grams of sugars. with fifteen grams of protein to help manage hunger... look who's getting smart about her weight. [ male announcer ] glucerna hunger smart. a smart way to help manage hunger and diabetes. >> pelley: welcome back to cbs news
figures i admire probably more than anybody in american history is dr. king and president lincoln. for me to have the opportunity to use the bible they used on the 105th anniversary of the emancipation proclamation and the 50th anniversary of the march on washington is fitting. their actions and the movement they represent are the only reason that it is possible for me to be inaugurated. it is also a reminder for me that this country has gone through tough times before but we always come out on the other side. we're constantly perfecting our union and making it more fair. we want everybody to have a fair shot in this country. if you work hard, you can make it. regardless of where you come from or what you look like. it is probably the most important thing to keep in mind when you are president of the united states. i will uphold my oath of office at the same time letting me remind people of the sacrifices of the past. from the presidential inaugural committee host: first lady michelle obama just turned 49 last week. she will have a big role during the next couple of days. here is take twe
down the mall toward lincoln's memorial where dr. king gave his most famous speech. to spell out the country his vision for the next four years. it is america's quadrennial celebration of the office of the presidency, the orderly transition of power, the luminaries, the singers, the salutes, the speech, the pomp, the circumstance, the second inauguration of president barack obama starts right now. >>> welcome to washington. it is chilly but frankly bearable outside as the country prepares to celebrate the peaceful maintenance of power, the transferns of power from the first term administration of president barack obama to his second term administration. the president was officially sworn in by chief justice john roberts yesterday at the blue room at the white house as the first lady and the obama daughters looked on. but in the little less than two hours the president will affirm that oath before a much larger crowd with 100% more pomp and an equal proportion of circumstance. we have a stellar group of guests joining us throughout the day. honestly, to cut to the chase, it is pre
'll come through the rotunda, walk by that bust of dr. martin luther king, jr., and then into statuary hall for a tradition that's the most exclusive lunch you can imagine. all of the nation's leaders, the president, the vice president, congressional leaders, supreme court justices, their spouses, they will all gather for a lunch to put politics aside for at least a brief moment. >> thank you very much, jan. >>> as we watch the president's motorcade approaching the capitol, let me give you a little bit of an advanced look on what you're seeing as the inauguration ceremonies proceed. as we mentioned, senator charles schumer of new york will be the master of ceremonies. he will have a short speech and then he will be introducing myrlie evers-williams, a former chair of the naacp and the widow of medgar evers. the naacp field secretary who was gunned down in 1963. one of the great heroes of the civil rights movement. myrlie evers-williams will be giving the invocation at the beginning of the ceremonies and then we will see justice sonia sotomayor who is one of the newer associate justices on t
of ms. evers representing the legacy of dr. king. the cuban american poet representing that particular aspect of the diversity, if you will, that -- and how this president got re-elected all here, all having their place on the platform. the other thing i have to say, too, you know, we are reminded that the inauguration day celebration is basically a three-part play. this is ending. the president will be inside the capitol for about an hour. we will move on, of course, to the parade this afternoon and tonight those two inaugural balls, if you will. but, again, having inauguration day, too, on the martin luther king holiday, amazing symmetry for us long-time washingtonians who get to work heerl during the week. >> for only the second time has the inauguration taken place on a king day holiday. back in bill clinton's second inaugural was the second time. eamon jabbers has been out there. the first thing i noticed how many sort of multi-generational groups there were and how many african-americans were coming to washington bringing either their parents or their grandparents to see this eve
proclamation, almost 50 years after the march on washington, dr. king delivered the i have a dream speech, it says something about the distance we have come, the progress we have made and for him to make a speech that was so inclusive, it was about black people, white people, asian americans, latino, native americans, straight, gay, that we're one people. we're one family. we are one house. we all live in the american house. >> well, about that last point, congressman, we want to let you go and enjoy your lunch, we all do live in the same house and there you are. you have gone from the struggle earlier in your life to a warrior in the house of representatives. you have got an anxious american public watching. a lot of them would really like to see some folks getting along in washington. what are the prospects for that? >> the prospects are very bright. we're going to continue to work together and pull together, to look out for the common good. one thing i have endured the past three years was a group -- taking democrats and republicans, blacks, whites, latinos, asian americans back to som
of recognizes dr. king's birthday and commitment to that agenda. we were at the church service and the agenda i don't think i've seen a president do for civil rights leaders and later on had a private reception at the white house. >> how was his mood? >> very upbeat and hopeful. i think his speech was about him setting a tone for where he saw the rest of the century going. i don't think it was about four years for him. he's giving a vision. he thinks in terms, when he talks to us, about kennedy talking about the new frontier or johnson about the great society. i don't think everything he addressed yesterday was about everything he wanted to legislate, about where he sees the country going, his vision. >> an eye towards history. >> i think that's how he saw the inaugural address and he effectively did it. i think his specific of the next four years is the state of the union and his vision of "i had a cream." >> and what you said in the white house was illuminating. >> while you're drinking, everything i said was illuminating. >> amen. don't you wish that people in the pews could be drinking on t
, i'm not running because i think it's my turn. i'm running because of what dr. king called, "the fierce urgency of now." "the fierce urgency of now." >> throughout that year, the obama campaign assembled a nationwide network of dedicated volunteers, and they broke fundraising records by mastering the internet. early on obama trailed senator hillary clinton by large margins in national polls, and struggled against doubts and criticism. >> early on, supporting senator obama was a somewhat lonely position within the democratic caucus. it was a lonely position within the congressional black caucus. it will probably shock our children, uh and future scholars that the congressional black caucus lagged in support for the first black president of the united states. >> but obama believed that america was ready to support him, as the embodiment of a message of hope, unity, and change. especially young people, of all races and backgrounds, who were his most enthusiastic supporters from the beginning. >> thank you! what up? what up? what's been so inspiring is not just the size of the crowds
ii. they are being honored as they should be. especially on dr. martin luther king jr. day here. >> there is a tuskogee airmen float that will go by today. >> they were discriminated against, world war ii, the military was still segregated. it took harry truman to integrate the armed forces. but they fought heroically. mostly in europe. and several of them are still alive. >> yes, yes, they are. and even as we watch what's going on. you see the president. i think he wants this to get going. what does the vice president haveness hand? a little program? >> maybe it is a little program. i wouldn't be surprised. they probably want to know who's coming up and who's next. i'm sure they also want to know which float they get to see next. >> and i see -- they did not change their outfits. >> but it must be heated i'm guessing. >> the glass part is heated. >> it must be heated because they all seem more comfortable. actually, when the sun came out, it got very comfortable here. >> yeah, they're in a closed area right now so they can take off their overcoats and relax and enjoy and have a
. that beginning at 9:30. the first family urges all americans to help honor dr. martin luther king jr. then tomorrow, president obama and vice president biden are officially sworn in. the public inaugural ceremonies happen monday. >>> today, metro is selling its collective inauguration trip card. riders can buy the preloaded cards for $15 until 10:00 p.m. the cards will also be for sale tomorrow. metro is urging riders to avoid using paper tickets because of crowds at the machines. >>> a road in northwest d.c. is closed this morning after a deadly shooting overnight. officers were called to the 2700 block of georgia avenue northwest around 2:30 this morning. a man was found outside chuck & billy's lounge. he was pronounced dead a short time later. >>> we're going to check your inauguration forecast next. flarn there is no mass-produced human. every human being is unique. and there is one store that recognizes it. the sleep number store. the only place in the world you'll find... the extraordinarily comfortable sleep number experience. an exclusive collection of innovations that totall
. >>> president obama will be sworn in tomorrow using two bibles. the lincoln bible and dr. martin luther king jr.'s bible, and they will be stacked on top of each other. >>> and then a wreath laying ceremony along the title basin to mark mlk day which is tomorrow. it begins at noon. >>> hundreds of people marched and rallied to keep king's dream alive, and they gathered for the peace and freedom walk. >> he would be happy that people are continuing his legacy, and that's recognizing the opportunity we have at least once a year, and not so much to remember him, but to remember the principles to which he stood. >> besides honoring king's legacy, speakers addressed issues facing d.c. residents including d.c. statehood. >>> the "today" show starts at nbc 4 here at 8:00. >> you are in town, and long time no see. >> long time no see. yes, it was nice because we got to see time together yesterday. >> and you were at a ball, and you are probably really tired? >> yeah, and we have an incredible makeup team so you will not see the bags under my eyes. we are happy to be in your neck of the woods for obama'
, volunteered, and made a difference. dr. martin luther king, jr. would have been proud we used his birthday weekend not just to party and celebrate, but to remember what he called us often to do, and that, ladies and gentlemen, is to serve and to answer the call, and, yet, i want to thank the dnc staff and others who worked throughout the christmas and throughout the holidays to ensure we also had a good time as well. so my only thing, i was working yesterday. you want me to shut up? you know i can talk all day. i'm baptist during the day, but catholic on sundays. >> keep preaching. >> thank you. yesterday was so inspiring, so inspiring. the most remarkable thing about the president's speech is about how incollusive it was. the fact that the president of the united states of america talked about us, the people of america, and he affirmed yesterday what our framers placed in the constitution, that we are equal in the eyes of god, and, yet, some of my fellow pundits had problems when he mentioned -- of course they had some issues. i wanted to figure out what was the president talking about wh
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)

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